Turkey Preferential Trade Agreements

Trump`s move had shaken the Turkish pound. Since then, relations between the two countries have been strained over differences ranging from Ankara`s plan to buy a Russian missile system to divergent interests in Syria. The provisions relating to the protection of intellectual property rights (Article 15 and a new Annex XII) concern, among other things, patents, trademarks, copyrights and geographical indications. The agreement provides tariff concessions for agricultural products processed under Schedule III. Trade in agricultural commodities is covered by three bilateral agricultural agreements negotiated between the EFTA state concerned, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland/Liechtenstein and Turkey. While bilateral agricultural agreements between Norway and Turkey, as well as Iceland and Turkey, remain in force, the bilateral agricultural agreement between Switzerland and Turkey has also been modernized and will replace the existing bilateral agricultural agreement after the modernized EFTA-Turkey free trade agreement comes into force. These bilateral agricultural agreements are part of the instruments for creating the free trade area. They provide for significant concessions on both sides, taking into account the respective sensitivities. Without prejudice to WTO provisions, the Turkey-EU customs union provides an important legal basis for Turkey`s free trade agreements. Within the framework of the customs union, Turkey is directing its trade policy towards the EU`s common trade policy.

This harmonization concerns both autonomous regimes and preferential agreements with third countries. On the other hand, thanks to decision 1/2000 of the CE-Turkey Customs Cooperation Committee of 25.07.2000 (JO L 200 of 25.07.2000). The customs union allows goods that meet the conditions of free movement within the customs union, but are negotiated between the EC and Turkey through other countries in the pan-European system of accumulation, provided that evidence of Community or Turkish origin is provided in one of the countries concerned. The EU has decided to focus on bilateral trade agreements as an instrument for boosting growth, with the introduction of its new “Global Europe” trade strategy in 2006. In line with this strategy, the EU has begun negotiating free trade agreements with specific provisions on services, investment, public procurement and intellectual property rights, in order to increase/maintain its competitiveness in global markets. Turkey is preparing for such an environment. After starting and starting negotiations in parallel with the EU, Turkey is also adapting to all the issues covered in the agreements and negotiating next-generation free trade agreements with its potential partners.